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Extant Iron Age / Viking / Medieval Hoods

Extant Finds
  • Friday, March 07 2008 @ 11:30 AM AEDT
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Extant Iron Age / Viking / Medieval Hoods
By Jennifer Baker
Hodegon - New Varangian Guard
Feb 2008
Iron Age to Early Medieval Total Number of hoods – 8

Hoods with out tails / lirpipe – 7
Hoods with tails / lirpipe – 1
Hoods with no gores - 7
Hoods with front gore – 0
Hoods with Back gore – 0
Hood with shoulder gores - 1

Early Medieval 8 - 11th c Total Number of hoods – 5

Hoods with out tails / lirpipe – 5
Hoods with tails / lirpipe – 0
Hoods with no gores - 4
Hoods with front gore – 1
Hoods with Back gore – 1
Hood with shoulder gores - 0

High Medieval 12 - 14th c. Total Number of hoods – 24

Hoods with out tails / lirpipe – 1
Hoods with tails / lirpipe – 23
Hoods with no gores - 13
Hoods with front gore – 6
Hoods with Back gore – 0
Hood with shoulder gores - 2

Click "Read More" for details and descriptions of the hoods.

Location Items Name / Cat No. Description Date
Iron Age to Early Medieval
Thorsberg Mose, Denmark Thorsberg Hood shoulder-cape. Much shorter than a cloak, this consisted of a hood with cloth extending down over the shoulders. The seem came right down the front center Danish bronze age
Vendsyssel Vendsyssel cape & hood The fur-cape with hood  
Treveran (modern France) Treveran Hood A cape made of a single piece of leather ?????
Hedeby (Haithabu), Germany Heddeby Hood Small tail 9th-10th C
Sunnfjord Norway Sunnfjord Hood hood with rounded head – with no tail – Shoulder Gore ?????
Krogens Mψlle mose Denmark Krogens Mψlle Hood fur-cape with hood – A patch-work leather example Pollen analysis dated to Iron age to middle ages
St Andrew Parish Orkney Orkney Hood fringed woolen hood cloak
primary material is wool
Description: relatively unshaped hood with long-fringed cape – Decorative band sewn to body of hood
Its one-piece cut it is more simple than the hoods of the Middle Ages; the hood section is squarish with no tail, and the cowl is small and conical. It was made of herringbone twill trimmed with deep bands of textured tablet-weaving in two colors, and it had twisted fringing a foot long (Henshall 1954, 10).
Radiocarbon-dating by the National Museums of Scotland established that the Orkney Hood dated from between 250 – 615 AD
Bernuthsfeld Germany Bernuthsfeld Hood   7th c. Late Iron Age (e.g. Roman Empire, Migration Era)
Early Medieval 8 – 11th c.
Island of Andψya Veserεlen northern Norway Skjoldehamn hood Hood – with no tail – front & back gore The carbon dating has placed the garments to 995-1029 CE.
York England Jorvik (Coppergate) Hood women's silk hood – No. 1332 primary material is silk
Description: coif-like hood – for a woman
Early Medieval (roughly 8-11th c.) 10-11th c.
York England Jorvik (Coppergate) Hood women's silk hood – No. ??? primary material is silk
Description: coif-like hood – for a woman
Early Medieval (roughly 8-11th c.) 10-11th c.
York England Jorvik (Coppergate) Hood women's silk hood – No. 651 Description: cap/hood of "Viking" type
primary material is silk
Early Medieval (roughly 8-11th c.) 10-11th c
Saltergate, Lincoln England Saltergate women's silk hood Primary material is silk
Description: coif-like hood
Early Medieval (roughly 8-11th c.) 10-11th c
High Medieval 12 – 14th c
Boksten Sweden Bocksten Hood hood with a 90 centimetre long and 2 centimetre wide liripipe or "tail".
The primary material is wool
Description: with shoulder cape and liripipe
red v-shaped piece on front
1290 – 1430
A bit of the cloth was radiocarbon dated in the late 1980s. It gave as result a 68 percent likelihood of a date between 1290 and 1410 and a 95 percent likelihood of a date between 1290 and 1430. Some uncertainties do however arise as the conservation process might have affected the result.
Norway Norwegian hood lirpipe hood
- Om gamle gravskikker og fem lik fra Uvdal
late 13th C.
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.65 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 1 hood (long cape w/front gore)
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.66 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 1 hood (long cape w/front gore)
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.67 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 1 hood (long cape w/front gore)
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.68 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 1 hood (long cape w/front gore)
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.69 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 1 hood – not preserved
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.70 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 1 hood (long cape w/front gore)
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.71 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 2 hood (short cape, no gore)
Item No. 71. Hood. Face edge turned under sewn down with rows of backstitches
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.72 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 2 hood (short cape, no gore)
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.73 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 2 hood (short cape, no gore)
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.74 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 2 hood (short cape, no gore)
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.75 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 2 hood (short cape, no gore)
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.76 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 2 hood (short cape, no gore)
No. 76. Hood. Front edge turned under and sewn with backstitches
No. 76. Hood. Front edge raw edge overcast
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.77 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 2 hood (short cape, no gore)
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.78 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 2 hood (short cape, no gore)
No. 78. Hood. Edges of hood turned under & sewn with 1 or 2 rows of backstitch
No 78. Hood. Raw edges overcast
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.79 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 2 hood (short cape, no gore)
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.80 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 2 hood (short cape, no gore)
No. 80. Hood. Front edge at face turned under, sewn w/2 rows of backstitch
No. 80. Hood. Raw edge overcast
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.81 The primary material is wool
Description: Type 2 hood (short cape, no gore)
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
Herjolfsnes Greenland Herjolfsnes Hood – No.82 The primary material is wool
Description: fragment, tail only of hood
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
London, England London Hood - No. 246. The primary material is wool
Description: button front
No. 246. Hood. Remains of 9 buttonholes under the chin, probably stitched with linen, as stitches are missing
Hood design based on no. 246, as presented in Textiles and Clothing. It was in a late 14th Century deposit, and was of a tabby woven cloth. Two triangular pieces, apparently cut from the "chin" of the hood, are inserted as gussetts in the sides of the hood. The button holes were initially supported by an inner facing, or perhaps a lining. This sort of close fitting buttoned hood is seen in manuscripts, and is worn by women. They were often worn open atop other cloths, and therefore, this style is ancestral to apparel such as the later "French hoods".
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
late 14th Century
London, England London Hood - No. 174 Hood design based on no. 174, as presented in Textiles and Clothing. It was in a late 14th Century deposit, and was of a tabby woven cloth. A triangular piece, apparently cut from the "chin" of the hood is inserted as gussetts in the front of the hood. It has a short liripipe. High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)
late 14th Century
London, England London Hood - No. 247. Hood design based on no. 247, as presented in Textiles and Clothing. It was in a late 14th Century deposit, and was of a tabby woven cloth. Two triangular pieces, apparently cut from the "chin" of the hood, are inserted as gussetts in the sides of the hood. The button "holes" are loops sewn into the edge. High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.) late 14th Century
(site unknown) Central Europe
current location - Vienna, Weltliche Schatzkammer
Vienna Hood The primary material is silk
Description: matches eagle dalmatic, this garment was lost in the 18th century and is known only from sketches
High Medieval (roughly 12-14th c.)

Thank you to the following people - For helping to case down, the details on some of the Hoods.

Cherilyn Fuhlbohm - Antioch New Varangian Guard
Andrea Willett – Dubh Linn New Varangian Guard
Sandy Sempel - Frojel Gotlantica Viking Re-enactment Society
Prof Lena Strid – Waterford & Oxford Archaeology

Web References :
The Surviving Garments Database
Sewing Stitches Used in Medieval Clothing
Some Clothing of the Middle Ages
An Archaeological Guide to Vνking Men's Clothing

Book Reference:
Thor Ewing 'Viking Clothing' Tempus Publishing 2006 ISBN 0 7524 3587 6

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